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4 Comments Already

mygif
queenrakle Said,
February 25th, 2011 @2:53 am  

I know this doesn’t answer your question, but I wanted to address the standardized testing. If your child has been diagnosed with dyslexia, you can ask the school to make modifications for standardized testing. To do this though, you will have to step a little into the special education. You would have to call a child study meeting and set up an IEP (Individualized Education Program). Doing this ‘classifies’ him as someone needing help, but does not classify him as ‘special ed’. In fact, only one of my students with special needs actually has any interaction with special education staff. Everything they need is modified by the general ed teacher in the regular classroom. The IEP would allow you to make his testing situation much better without having to take him away from the regular classroom. Even though this didn’t answer your question, I hope it helped!

mygif
crabby_blindguy Said,
February 25th, 2011 @3:41 am  

Congragulations on havingg the wisdom to break away from the system! I wish more parents in your situation would do the same–we might get osome badly needed changes.

As a researcher in the disability area, I have a very dim view of the so-called “tiered” or “Special-ed” diplomas. They are in practice a way of labeling–and discrediting–people with disabilities. I know that’s not what the PC rhetoric says–but I’m talking about the realities.

Here’s a heads-up. If your son has a 3.0, he can do the work–he’s proven that. To get a regular diploma, he’ll probably have to take some of those stupid (and they areP standardized tests. BUT–he is legally entitled to reasonable testing accommodations-(i.e., extende time and possibly an space thats quiet and free of distractions). And he is entitled to it with or without an IEP. Don’t take no for an answer on this–it’s not an option that can be refused.

If it doesn’t prove practicle to get a regular diploma, you need to check with local colleges–find out what their policies are (they have to acccept a Spec.Ed. diploma, but you need to figure out the best options for your son). It’s possible it won’t make any difference–but its alsopossible he’d be better off with a GED.

He’s earned a regular diploma–no question about that–but this supposedly “progressive” system of labeled diplomas means he’s denied what he’s earned, focus on getting the paper s you need for him to start college. Once hes on track there, it won’t matter.

A last thought–in college, you will find that they have no IEP’s, etc. Most colleges do have Disability Services offices–and you should make full use of them. They do not act as a crutch–they are there only to make sure the accomodations your son will need are available. And they are run by the individual schools, not by the bureaucrats. They have their faults–but they are an asset instead of a liabiity.

Good luck to you all! :)

mygif
doulasc Said,
February 25th, 2011 @4:04 am  

from what I hear a special ed diploma is a certificate of
completion and you can not go to college on it let alone
get a decent job.I am sorry to say it is worthless piece of
paper.

mygif
anikkalane Said,
February 25th, 2011 @4:57 am  

I won’t repeat the previous answers, but here is one more thing to think of. If your son is doing well in regular classes, then every bit of improvement in his reading ability is extremely important – I’m sure you know that already.

The best way to improve his actual reading ability is through a program that is specifically designed to remediate dyslexia. I bet you have also seen that additional years of generic “reading instruction” may offer some or little improvement.

If you haven’t already, check out Linda-Mood Bell and Scottish Rite. A gain of even a year or two in his reading level could be a real factor in his ability to receive a diploma. Not to mention how much his reading ability will affect his adult life.

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