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4 Comments Already

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Vicki D Said,
March 6th, 2011 @2:26 pm  

You do not need an Associates degree first, but it won’t hurt if you have one.

I would be reluctant to recommend an online program for a degree in Library Science. Using a college library would seem to be an important skill for you to gain as a student. If I were on a search committee, I would be reluctant to recommend hiring someone who did their degree entirely online.

That being said, you should check out the best “brick & mortar” colleges and universities for a bachelors in Library Science and then see if they offer classes online. This way you can get the best program and still have the chance to have some classes online. This is how my current grad program works. Some of my classes are online, some are on campus, and others (my favorites) are a combination of both.

It takes a lot of self-directedness to do an entirely online program.

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Tammy M. Said,
March 6th, 2011 @3:07 pm  

Indiana state university, Syracuse University, Drexel University etc. You can find a list of accredited online colleges and universities offering the degree of your choice at http://www.onlineedublog.com/

hope it helps :)

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Mark V Said,
March 6th, 2011 @3:22 pm  

Recent studies say that men with a college degree are more likely to have success in forming relationships with women, than those who stop their education after high school. The reasons for this are not hard to understand. The percentage of women attending college nowadays is higher than the percentage of men. With so many women possessing a college degree, it makes sense that they would prefer to date someone who has a college education too. It doesn’t necessarily mean that a person with a high school diploma is uneducated. It merely means that he may not possess the kind of knowledge and polish that a college degree can give.

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Rene C Said,
March 6th, 2011 @3:37 pm  

The key is to make sure the college/university is accredited. I have three basic recommendations for everyone looking into online/distance education. They all have to do with exploring; after all, you have to defend your assets.

1. Make certain that you have triple checked their accreditation. First, they tell you what it is, then you go to that accrediting body’s website (not through the link provided by the school), and thirdly you would visit the department of education to see what they have to say. Do your diligent research into the institutions once you have narrowed down to a couple. You can look at the Better Business Bureau for more information on the college.

2. You must have extreme self motivation and be able to teach yourself per say. This means that you will not have someone telling you verbally, so it is up to you to get the information from the course room, text, and other resources. The best way to look at it is like a guided independent study course.

3. Review your goals, personal and professional. Make sure that the school that you are going to offers the programs that match your goals. Do not settle. There are many programs that are similar, but you have to make the ultimate decision. Do not let it be based on finances and length of program, but the fact that when you are finished or near finished you will be able to assume your proper place in the career field sought.

You should market yourself and not the degree or university. There are many traditional universities offering degrees that can be earned through online methods. Look at that if you are truly concerned with the name of the school. Good luck on your search!

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