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7 Comments Already

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joe.bruner Said,
December 23rd, 2010 @6:56 pm  

Most teachers in the US only have a bachelor’s degree. An English degree could put you anywhere in K-12, with your best shot in teaching English to middle school or high school students. You have to interview with administration and a department head at the school where you wish to teach. You may have to pursue a teaching certificate over the summer. Usually, these aren’t too difficult to get.

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mikeleibo Said,
December 23rd, 2010 @7:05 pm  

Most cities DO NOT require teaching degrees – I know you can get one in GA without one.

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Monica O Said,
December 23rd, 2010 @8:05 pm  

New Jersey.

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Don V Said,
December 23rd, 2010 @8:22 pm  

You do need a teaching credential to teach in a k-12 school district in the U.S. But in private schools and perhaps charter schools you could teach with only a ba. In California, you only need a BA, CBEST, TB test and fingerprinting to substitute teach.

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None Profound Said,
December 23rd, 2010 @9:09 pm  

Private schools, Charter schools, and Parochial schools. Before I got my teachers certification I only had a BA in English and I worked at a Charter School. Now I have my Teachers Certification, but I chose to work at a Private School, and all you need is a BA in the subject you’re teaching.

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carnaby_fudge Said,
December 23rd, 2010 @9:36 pm  

english is a core subject so there will always be a demand for them in the middle and high schools. look at areas that have major teacher shortages like las vegas and parts of arizona. they are more willing to play ball when it comes to educational requirements.
but because of nclb you will have to get the credential some time. failing the high need areas you may get into a private school with only a b.a. but they are increasingly using nclb standards as well.

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JB Said,
December 23rd, 2010 @10:35 pm  

I know where I teach, which is an elementary school in NJ, there were two teachers who completed the alternate route program that is offered. The people had their bachelors degrees (one of them in criminal justice) and during their first year of teaching they attended teacher certification class one night a week and on a few Saturdays. (The link below shows NJs guidelines for alternate route.)

Good luck, and I hope you find your “education career” as rewarding as I have found mine to be.

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