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2 Comments Already

mygif
B??·B?? Said,
January 3rd, 2011 @5:35 pm  

I go to a community college in my town but i am enrolled in all online classes. Community colleges are cheaper, therefore you get financial aid money back (with a university, they would take most or all of your fiancial aid to cover expenses). I am about to recieve my associates in arts & science, all from taking online classes. They will have “distant learning courses” which is where you can take onlines with other colleges that are affiliated with your college. But this is just for the associates (Basics), which is what you would need next after getting your GED. Then you will have to look for another online college to cover your Bachlors. I believe “MIDWAY” college has an online program. You can check them out to see if they offer social work or not. Plus there are always ads on tv about online colleges and getting your degree. Hope i helped some what. (:

mygif
Jacquot - cette fois-ci Said,
January 3rd, 2011 @5:56 pm  

It really depends on what you are looking for. Or more accurately, what your expectations are.

I’ve attended Ashworth College to get a career diploma in Veterinary Assisting. Now honestly, that alone doesn’t make me qualified to make $35,000 a year at a Vet Clinic. But it’s an entry level step that I needed to make when taking into account my need to work full time and my limited opportunity to gain “on the job” training to get my foot in the door.

The courses themselves? It was as good as anything I did at the traditional school I attended 15 years earlier.

Now comes the qualifier. What kind of a learner are you? When you research various schools, a common complaint is a “lack of help”. Honestly, this is a valid critique. You do have to be the type that is willing to work on finding your own answers. The answers are there to be found and the material is presented in a way that you should be able to do just that. But there are some that need to have information spoon fed to them by a person. Those with that type of learning style will fail at online college.

Remember, many online colleges have “National” accreditation. That will make it difficult to transfer credits to an old style brick college, as they aren’t all that enthusiastic about legitimizing competition. However, if you are content with getting an Associates or Bachelors from the school you are attending online, this shouldn’t be an issue.

Research what goals you have and how the education will help you achieve them. For example, if you wanted to become a Certified Vet Tech, you need to choose one of the 3 online schools that have this accrediation. Going to any other school will not allow you to become Certified. It’s that sort of thing, nothing that research won’t help.

This all sounds confusing, but honestly it’s a worthwhile investment. It does require that you are able to work at your own pace, are disciplined and can wait for help if you need it. Also, you will need to have your education paid for before you can receive your degree. Like any other college really, but a lot of people don’t seem to understand this going in. It’s just that if you need a loan, you’ll have to do it privately in many online schools. They have pretty good payment plans.

To answer your final question, an Associated Degree in Health Management from Ashworth (my next goal) will make me eligible to work many jobs in my local hospital system, beyond the basic clerical work.

Good luck. :)

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