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6 Comments Already

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Akbar B Said,
June 6th, 2011 @3:28 am  

go to monster.com or careerbuilder.com and input your info and and you will get a reading of your career choices as well as what the pay scale are for that industry.

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kris Said,
June 6th, 2011 @3:36 am  

Since you have a master’s degree, you could teach at the college level. Trust me, it’s much less stressful than teaching high school or middle school!

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ms_hargraves Said,
June 6th, 2011 @4:08 am  

Go to Amazon.com and look at two sets of books.
One: VGM Career Books. They often start with the phrase, “Resumes for…” as in “Resumes for Communications Careers” and “Resumes for Mid-Career Job Changes.”
Two: the Real-Resumes Series with titles such as “Real-Resumes for Career Changers: Actual Resumes and Cover Letters” and “Real-Resumes for Teachers” which includes a section for teachers who want to change careers.
These are the two sets of books I recommend. As far as getting help from a real-live person…. how about the Career Placement Center of the University where you graduated (or any local university)? I’ve used books and my university.
Hope this helps.

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rhetorica Said,
June 6th, 2011 @4:44 am  

Don’t know if anyone else has mentioned this, but using a skills-based resume will help for parallel job changes (i.e., moving to a different field, position, industry). There, you emphasize categories of skills, such as communication, computer abilities, and other such things. I usually create a category that addresses the job position itself, which changes, of course, every time I apply for something new.

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Faith Said,
June 6th, 2011 @5:28 am  

If you have an interest, you can work in a company as a trainer, or a technology trainer, or in grant writing. Other sources include companies at professional conventions, educational services centers, college teaching, and tutoring companies.

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TumbleTim Said,
June 6th, 2011 @5:49 am  

Look into working for publishing companies that produce textbooks and teacher materials. (example: Scott Foresman, McGraw Hill, Houghton Mifflin). I suspect your English background, combined with your teaching experiences, will leave you qualified for content writing, editing, and more…..

Just a thought…. good luck

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